Tag Archives: Athletic Training

Secrets of Strength Volume 3: Pause Reps

Sorry for the post hiatus, school has been hitting hard as I near the end of the last academic semester in my DPT program.  I am five months from graduation and couldn’t be more excited. But enough about me ~ let us get to the next edition of The Secrets of Strength!

Graduation_hats

When it comes to strength training it seems to be common practice for everyone to attempt PR’s everyday.  Week in and week out, people pile the weight on the bars and lift as heavy as they can until they plateau, form breaks or injury occurs.  I myself have fallen into this trap. As a young lad I would lift heavy every day, play sports and consistently over train.  The result was moderate strength and being injury plagued throughout high school and part of college. I have strained muscles, sprained my MCL, herniated a disc in my back, and broken bones. The list goes on and on.  As I gained knowledge in training and program design I learned that you do not need to lift over 90% of your 1RM every single session to get strong.  I am stronger now than I was when I was always lifting near maximal, and I have not had as many injuries or pain as compared to 4 or 5 years ago.  The sooner you can come to understand this, I guarantee you will not only be stronger than ever, but also be injury free.

Why to use Pause Reps to get strong and back off your 1 RM

Simple&Sinister

I have dabbled here and there with pause reps, but never fully incorporated them into my own programming.  That is about to change.  Once I finish the Simple and Sinister program by Pavel (which I will be writing about in the future), I will be adding pause reps into my program to aid in my strength goals.

The reason I want to add pause presses into my program, aside from using them to monitor my overall workout intensity, is to master my technique, assist me at key points of the exercise and use more muscle mass.

Mastery of Technique

Pausing at the bottom of a lift and maintaining tension is a self-limiting task.  If you use a weight too heavy and try pausing, your technique will break and you will not be able to complete the lift.  By pausing under moderate weight, you make sure your biomechanics are correct every time. This helps drive better technique.  Even though you will be lifting a percentage of the weight you normally lift, it will still kick your ass.

For example, I tend to struggle with the transition between the eccentric and concentric phases of my squat.  I will sometimes side bend or lean forward as I try to drive out of the hole.  Pause reps will help me with this problem and allow me to hit some PR’s.

Use of More Muscle Mass

When it comes to lifting, we have an eccentric and concentric portion of the lift.  As we complete the eccentric phase of an exercise, energy is stored.  This energy is stored in the passive structures, (i.e. the tendons and ligaments) and assist us in the concentric portion by releasing that energy (think of pulling on a rubber band and letting go).  When we pause in our lifts, we take these passive structures out of the equation.  We require the muscles to actively hold us, and produce enough force to move a weight.  This is the reason pause reps will still give you such a great workout.  Think about holding a weight in the hole of the squat for 2-5 seconds before having to explode out of it… I am cringing at the thought of it.  But no one said the process of gains is always fun!

Arnold Bench

How to use Pause Reps

Without thoroughly using pause reps, I am not going to prescribe percentages, reps or situations in which to incorporate them… at least not yet.  If the “why to use them” (the reasons why I will be using pause reps) intrigues you, I will refer you to an article on T-Nation by Christian Thibaudeau.  He goes into depth on how to use this methodology to help make you stronger.  You can check that out here.


Secrets of Strength Volume 2: Non-Traditional Feats of Strength

Cirque

When we think of strength, we generally think of it as how much weight one can move.  And as fun as it would be to deadlift a truck, or be able to bench press 3, 4, 500 lbs, there are other fun ways to display your strength. Would you expect to be able to perform sophisticated feats of strength with just your body weight, or maybe just simply standing up from the floor?  The answer is defined down below, and may surprise you!

5 Ways You Can Display Non-Traditional Impressive Feats of Strength

1. Turkish Get-up

  • The T-Get up is an ultimate test of strength, mobility and stability of the entire body.  You need to be able to stack your joints on top of each other and maintain stable joints under load, so the rest of your body can move without dropping a kettlebell, barbell or person on your head.
  • The movement involves lying down on the floor and standing up while maintaining a weight in the overhead position.
  • Begin this movement with a kettlebell.  Because the kettlebell keeps the weight external to the gripping hand, it offers unique advantages for shoulder health.

  • Progressions to impress
    • Barbell
    • Human Being

 2) Push-up

  • Most people that I see in the gym who are starting to workout with weights want to jump directly into the bench press and never want to start with the basics.  The push-up is the most under-rated exercise and is probably one that I see getting botched up the most.  Many people don’t have the core requirements, or were never taught the correct way to perform a perfect strict push-up.  But if you want to be impressive with your push-ups, an elite total of push-ups would be greater than 80 push-ups in a three minute period.
  • Doing this is not an eye-raising feat of strength.  If you want to up the ante, try progressing to the following.
    • One Arm Push-ups
    • One Arm – One Leg Push-ups

3. Iso 90/90 L Sit

  • This exercise requires not only significant core strength, but also considerable flexibility and upper body strength. The exercise requires you to hold yourself from a bar, rings, a tree, whatever you can grab a hold of; with elbows bent at 90 degrees and hips bent at 90 degrees.  I love exercises that require strength and tension to be developed throughout the body, that is what develops true strength.
  • To make this harder, go back to the original gymnastics L-Sit.  Press your hands into the floor and lift your butt and legs (they are to remain straight) off the floor).

4. Human Flag

  • This is probably my favorite one on the list.  This exercise crushes your entire lateral chain and requires you to build super-hero type strength that will gather crowds and applause from all. This kills your lats and obliques, and requires a lot of tension to hold.  The trick is in the pull/pull of the arms to generate enough force to allow the core to hold you up.

5. Levers

  • This is another gymnastic exercise that requires some serious core strength while turning heads when performed.  You can do these on monkey bars, tree branches, pull-up bars, rings, anything you can get your hands on.
  • The two types of levers I will be discussing here are the Front and Back levers.
    • Front Levers
      • This is an exercise that crushes your anterior core.  The arms, lats, delts, pecs and core all have to work synergistically to hold yourself in a straight line.
    • Back Levers
      • The easier of the two levers and the one that should be learned first.  The back lever attacks the posterior chain including the back, glutes, hamstrings, biceps and core.

  • If you want to learn more about training levers and other bodyweight feats, check out Al Kavado’s article here.

The aforementioned list are some fun exercises that will not only make you look more bad-ass, but will also make you stronger in your traditional strength training lifts: the dead-lift, squat, bench and overhead press.


Best Exercise You Ought to be Doing – The Kettlebell Pullover

2015 is here, and there are a lot of new faces in the gym.  “Resolution-ers” are filing in, jumping on the treadmill and banging out countless reps of sit-ups in hopes that this is the year they reach their goals.  If you have read my Core Training 101 post, you would already know that sit-ups are not the most effective way to strengthen your core. Nor will they help you get that six-pack you so desire.

Crunches

Enter the best core exercise in, well, ever.  The Kettlebell Pullover.  This is an exercise that I introduce to every client. I believe that it sets the foundation for strength and efficient movement.

Why you should use it-

  • Challenges The Core
    • When done correctly this exercise is taxing.  It looks easy at a glance, but when you maintain a posterior pelvic tilt and a rib pull, you will feel this like, “whoa!”  This is the type of exercise that the better you get, the harder it becomes.  If it is not difficult, you are not doing it correctly.
  • Teaches Proper Breath Patterning for Abdominal Support
    • Proper breathing is very important for your lower back and core.  And breathing properly helps maintain tightness and makes you stronger by increasing intra-abdominal pressure.  It is like wearing a weight belt without having to wear one.
    • This will ensure that you wont end up like those poor saps who wear a weight belt while walking around the gym or for arm curls.  Save those the weight belts for when you really need them to keep you from looking like a fool.Weight belt no no
  • Reinforces Technique at the Top of Squat and Deadlift
    • During the set up for the squat or deadlift, it is a common habit for people to hang out in an anterior pelvic tilt.  This puts increased stress on the lower back.  This exercise will help you build tension and find a better neutral position.  This will carry over to the top of your lifts and take excessive force off your spine.
  • Trains the deep core musculature – multifidus, transverse abdominus and obliques.
    • These muscles are very important for back health.  Studies have shown that those with recurring back pain have weak multifidi.  So this exercise can save your back!

The Technique

  • Start Position
    • Start lying on your back, with hips and knees bent at 90 degrees.
    • Grab kettlebell, medicine ball or dumbbell with arms extended over the chest
    • In this position, you will have a slight arch in your lower back.
  • The Movement
    • Flatten your lower back and sternum into the ground.  (Place an increased emphasis on your sternum and ribs)
    • Once flat, take a deep breath into your belly.
    • Reach your arms back as far as you can without any part of your lower back coming off the floor.
    • Once you reach the point in which your back wants to lift up, pull your ribs and spine harder into the ground and bring arms back to starting position.
  • Progressions
    • Make this exercise harder by
      • Lying on a foam roller
      • Putting your feet on the floor
      • Extend one leg outwards

If you can master this exercise, you will get the most out all your other core exercises. You will move better and have improved muscle activation and technique, not to mention a stronger, injury free back.


Best Articles From Last Week

I know it has been a long time since I have posted a best articles of the week post, but this series is back!  Down below are my summaries of a few articles that I found interesting and useful throughout the week (with there links below it) that I think will make for some good reading.

Hip-Thrust-Form

In today’s society, there is a great change happening in the fitness media.  The trend is not to be “model thin” anymore, but has become strong is sexy.  Along with this change, every woman wants a nicely toned derriere that would be worthy of Sir Mix A Lot “Booty Got Back” theme song. And fellas, don’t forget that woman don’t like men who have what my co-worker calls a “guillotine ass,” which is in reference to a guy with glutes so flat it looks like a guillotine had chopped it off (chopping hand gesture inserted here).   So how does one achieve this derriere especially when we live in a society that spends most of its time sitting on it?

At last, a solution! Glute Guy, Bret Contreras, has found the solution in this article. Bret uses EMG to test the differences between the squat and hip thrust to see how one could hypertrophy the glutes, so they too could land on the cover of paper magazine.

Squats vs Hip Thrusts – Bret Contreras

Running to First Base

In the strength and conditioning community running has gathered a bad rep.  If an athlete were to run, they would end up becoming small and weak, therefore, not to live happily ever after.  And in many ways this is true if that strength coach or personal trainer does not know what they are doing.  The bottom line becomes, any athlete and active person can benefit from aerobic training regardless of the goal.  The amount and intensity is all dependent on that person’s sport/lifestyle.  Read further to see why Mike Robertson, a renowned personal trainer and strength coach, recommends that aerobic training become better understood by fitness professionals as well as better utilized to help your client achieve the best results possible.

Real Talk About Aerobic Training for Athletes – Mike Roberston

LOW-CARB-PIC

I really like this article, and it does not just apply to active women.  Every person could benefit by understanding and knowing these three nutrition myths and how that can be holding you back from reaching your goals.  I especially think number three is important.  We hear that one a lot, and live and die by it, but we don’t always understand the implications of how this affects the physiology of the body.  Also, if you do cut calories, it should be cycled in and out, just as one would do in the exercise programs.  Meaning that if you were to cut calories to lose weight, it should be done in 2-4 week intervals, and then you should go back to consuming more calories.  This will serve to keep you from slowing your metabolism, losing lean muscle mass, and disrupting your hormonal balances.