Tag Archives: push-ups

Secrets of Strength Volume 2: Non-Traditional Feats of Strength

Cirque

When we think of strength, we generally think of it as how much weight one can move.  And as fun as it would be to deadlift a truck, or be able to bench press 3, 4, 500 lbs, there are other fun ways to display your strength. Would you expect to be able to perform sophisticated feats of strength with just your body weight, or maybe just simply standing up from the floor?  The answer is defined down below, and may surprise you!

5 Ways You Can Display Non-Traditional Impressive Feats of Strength

1. Turkish Get-up

  • The T-Get up is an ultimate test of strength, mobility and stability of the entire body.  You need to be able to stack your joints on top of each other and maintain stable joints under load, so the rest of your body can move without dropping a kettlebell, barbell or person on your head.
  • The movement involves lying down on the floor and standing up while maintaining a weight in the overhead position.
  • Begin this movement with a kettlebell.  Because the kettlebell keeps the weight external to the gripping hand, it offers unique advantages for shoulder health.

  • Progressions to impress
    • Barbell
    • Human Being

 2) Push-up

  • Most people that I see in the gym who are starting to workout with weights want to jump directly into the bench press and never want to start with the basics.  The push-up is the most under-rated exercise and is probably one that I see getting botched up the most.  Many people don’t have the core requirements, or were never taught the correct way to perform a perfect strict push-up.  But if you want to be impressive with your push-ups, an elite total of push-ups would be greater than 80 push-ups in a three minute period.
  • Doing this is not an eye-raising feat of strength.  If you want to up the ante, try progressing to the following.
    • One Arm Push-ups
    • One Arm – One Leg Push-ups

3. Iso 90/90 L Sit

  • This exercise requires not only significant core strength, but also considerable flexibility and upper body strength. The exercise requires you to hold yourself from a bar, rings, a tree, whatever you can grab a hold of; with elbows bent at 90 degrees and hips bent at 90 degrees.  I love exercises that require strength and tension to be developed throughout the body, that is what develops true strength.
  • To make this harder, go back to the original gymnastics L-Sit.  Press your hands into the floor and lift your butt and legs (they are to remain straight) off the floor).

4. Human Flag

  • This is probably my favorite one on the list.  This exercise crushes your entire lateral chain and requires you to build super-hero type strength that will gather crowds and applause from all. This kills your lats and obliques, and requires a lot of tension to hold.  The trick is in the pull/pull of the arms to generate enough force to allow the core to hold you up.

5. Levers

  • This is another gymnastic exercise that requires some serious core strength while turning heads when performed.  You can do these on monkey bars, tree branches, pull-up bars, rings, anything you can get your hands on.
  • The two types of levers I will be discussing here are the Front and Back levers.
    • Front Levers
      • This is an exercise that crushes your anterior core.  The arms, lats, delts, pecs and core all have to work synergistically to hold yourself in a straight line.
    • Back Levers
      • The easier of the two levers and the one that should be learned first.  The back lever attacks the posterior chain including the back, glutes, hamstrings, biceps and core.

  • If you want to learn more about training levers and other bodyweight feats, check out Al Kavado’s article here.

The aforementioned list are some fun exercises that will not only make you look more bad-ass, but will also make you stronger in your traditional strength training lifts: the dead-lift, squat, bench and overhead press.


The Big Five – The Final Saga: Push-ups/Bench

Mayan

I hope everyone has some Happy Holidays, and also are thankful that we survived the horrific end of the Mayan calendar.  Now that we all made it past the apocalypse, its time to stop letting ourselves go and get back into shape.  Again, it has been a long time since I put up a blog post, and it is time to end the saga of the “Big Five.”

THE BIG FIVE -THE BENCH PRESS.

Just about every guy in this world wants to have a bigger bench.  It is part of that XY gene every man carries.

The bench press is one of my weaker exercises, and because of this I had to work extra hard in order to push heavy weight. Through my hard work I have learned a trick or two along the way that can help take your bench to the next level.  But before we get to the tricks of the bench, we must first talk about technique.  This is the ground work to building a big bench, and many times just changing the technique can add a few pounds to your bench instantly:

heavy-bench-press

TECHNIQUE

  • Once lying on your back, place your hands on the bar slightly wider than your shoulders’ width.
  • Place your feet behind your knees, so that only your toes can touch the floor (you need this so you can drive your feet hard into the floor).
  • Squeeze your glutes hard, and try to pull your pockets apart (this will help you lock your glutes even tighter).
  • Pull your rib cage down to activate your core musculature.
  • Pack the scaps and pull the bar off the rack.

That was just for the set-up, now for the actual lift:

  • Pull the bar down to your chest as if you were doing a row.  You want to have full scapular retraction at the bottom.
  • As you are about to drive the bar back up, drive your heels to the ground (your heels should NOT touch the ground, your heels should only get closer to the floor.
  • Drive your shoulders into the bench and push hard towards the ceiling.
  • Make sure you maintain all the cues above in the set-up through-out the entire range of motion and through-out every rep completed.

Why make the bench technique so complicated?

Well for starters, force production starts from the ground up.  If you want to lift maximal weight, you must push hard through the floor to help increase force production.  The same reason we drive our shoulder blades into the bench as we push the weight up.

The scaps stayed packed so the chest musculature can perform its role maximally.  If we shrug or let our shoulders round out at the top we use other muscles to assist in the lift making us weaker rather then stronger. For you guys who are naturally strong and are lifting over 315 with bad technique, imagine how much you can bench if you use good technique and follow these techniques.

One of the biggest mistakes people make in the bench press is dropping the bar to their chest. You MUST, I will repeat this: YOU MUST have tension in your back through out the entire range of motion.  Your body is like a rubber band.  Your body stores energy within it so you can use it later.  The best example of this is you can jump higher with a running start then you could from a stand still.  By pulling down you will allow greater eccentric loading on the body, so when it comes time for the concentric portion, the weight will just explode off your chest.  This may take some time to get adjusted to, but it will surely pay off in the long run if you get the movement down pack.

BENEFITS TO THE BENCH PRESS

  1. Increased Muscle Mass – Every guy wants big pecs.  It is aesthetically pleasing, and will earn you respect from all around you.  Plus it will allow you become Mr. Romeo and help you get that lady you’ve been eying.
  2. Increased Strength – Both men and women can benefit from increased strength.  The compound movement of the bench press will help increase chest strength, tricep strength, and to a small degree, back strength (mostly in a stabilizing role).
  3. Improved Athletic Performance – This is something you will hear a lot, from a lot of people.  I am not a big believer in this.  Yes, you will be stronger, but how will that really affect you on the court or field? Probably not too much.  Dead-lifts and squats will help you a lot more with that.  But I definitely think that if you have a big bench, you most likely will have pretty big numbers in all your other lifts and also, for many athletes, it is a confidence thing.  When you bench big, you feel better about yourself and from a psycho-social standpoint can help increase a players’ performance by increasing their so-called “swag” on the field.

Improving Your Bench

Once you have the technique down, it’s time to get stronger.  There are quite a few ways we can go about that.

First, and what I personally believe to be the best way, is to increase your back strength and stability. I feel that almost everybody who attempts the bench press falls flat here.  With a weak back, there is no anchor for the pecs to work through.  This will cause energy to be lost through the chain causing missed pounds off the bar.  Here are some assistance exercises that can be used to improve scapular stability and back strength:

Scapular Stability

Scap Push-ups:

This is an exercise that is botched up quite often, but when done correctly can help with shoulder problems, and can help build us the stability needed to bench.  The scap push-up helps with upward rotation of the scapula as well as helps us get the scapula to sit on the rib cage better by targeting the serratus anterior.

To do a scap push-up get into a push-up position.  Get your core really tight by driving your belly button towards your chest, squeezing your glutes and drive your toes towards your knees.  Once set up, the movement is very simple – just pull your shoulder blades towards your feet.  YOU ARE NOT TO SQUEEZE YOUR SHOULDER BLADES TOGETHER.  All you are doing is squeezing your arm pit.  Your shoulders should move down towards your feet, and not together.  And you should not move.  Your body should pretty much be in the same position as you started, just your scaps pulled lower.  Once you get a good squeeze let the arm pits go and repeat.

Back Strength

In order to increase back strength, one should work both bilaterally and unilaterally.

Inverted Row

This is one of my favorites; it is just like an upside down push-up.  You can use either a TRX or a smith machine to do these.

To do an inverted row, just set up in a TRX or smith machine; grab the bar or handles and step underneath your hands.  Your position should be the front of your body facing the ceiling.  Once here, you will row yourself to the top so that the bottom of your chest touches the bar, (or by your ribs if your using a TRX).  Make sure your elbows go out, and your shoulder blades come together.

One Arm Row

Set up on a bench with the same side leg and arm resting on the bench.  The other leg and arm are off the bench, the leg on the floor so you can push through it.  Use the free arm to grab the weight and row it to your ribs.  Making sure again the chest is out, elbows are out and you slide your scapula towards your spine.

Stay tuned for part 2 that will discuss the push-up.