Tag Archives: Strength and Conditioning

Secrets of Strength Volume 3: Pause Reps

Sorry for the post hiatus, school has been hitting hard as I near the end of the last academic semester in my DPT program.  I am five months from graduation and couldn’t be more excited. But enough about me ~ let us get to the next edition of The Secrets of Strength!

Graduation_hats

When it comes to strength training it seems to be common practice for everyone to attempt PR’s everyday.  Week in and week out, people pile the weight on the bars and lift as heavy as they can until they plateau, form breaks or injury occurs.  I myself have fallen into this trap. As a young lad I would lift heavy every day, play sports and consistently over train.  The result was moderate strength and being injury plagued throughout high school and part of college. I have strained muscles, sprained my MCL, herniated a disc in my back, and broken bones. The list goes on and on.  As I gained knowledge in training and program design I learned that you do not need to lift over 90% of your 1RM every single session to get strong.  I am stronger now than I was when I was always lifting near maximal, and I have not had as many injuries or pain as compared to 4 or 5 years ago.  The sooner you can come to understand this, I guarantee you will not only be stronger than ever, but also be injury free.

Why to use Pause Reps to get strong and back off your 1 RM

Simple&Sinister

I have dabbled here and there with pause reps, but never fully incorporated them into my own programming.  That is about to change.  Once I finish the Simple and Sinister program by Pavel (which I will be writing about in the future), I will be adding pause reps into my program to aid in my strength goals.

The reason I want to add pause presses into my program, aside from using them to monitor my overall workout intensity, is to master my technique, assist me at key points of the exercise and use more muscle mass.

Mastery of Technique

Pausing at the bottom of a lift and maintaining tension is a self-limiting task.  If you use a weight too heavy and try pausing, your technique will break and you will not be able to complete the lift.  By pausing under moderate weight, you make sure your biomechanics are correct every time. This helps drive better technique.  Even though you will be lifting a percentage of the weight you normally lift, it will still kick your ass.

For example, I tend to struggle with the transition between the eccentric and concentric phases of my squat.  I will sometimes side bend or lean forward as I try to drive out of the hole.  Pause reps will help me with this problem and allow me to hit some PR’s.

Use of More Muscle Mass

When it comes to lifting, we have an eccentric and concentric portion of the lift.  As we complete the eccentric phase of an exercise, energy is stored.  This energy is stored in the passive structures, (i.e. the tendons and ligaments) and assist us in the concentric portion by releasing that energy (think of pulling on a rubber band and letting go).  When we pause in our lifts, we take these passive structures out of the equation.  We require the muscles to actively hold us, and produce enough force to move a weight.  This is the reason pause reps will still give you such a great workout.  Think about holding a weight in the hole of the squat for 2-5 seconds before having to explode out of it… I am cringing at the thought of it.  But no one said the process of gains is always fun!

Arnold Bench

How to use Pause Reps

Without thoroughly using pause reps, I am not going to prescribe percentages, reps or situations in which to incorporate them… at least not yet.  If the “why to use them” (the reasons why I will be using pause reps) intrigues you, I will refer you to an article on T-Nation by Christian Thibaudeau.  He goes into depth on how to use this methodology to help make you stronger.  You can check that out here.


Secrets of Strength Volume 2: Non-Traditional Feats of Strength

Cirque

When we think of strength, we generally think of it as how much weight one can move.  And as fun as it would be to deadlift a truck, or be able to bench press 3, 4, 500 lbs, there are other fun ways to display your strength. Would you expect to be able to perform sophisticated feats of strength with just your body weight, or maybe just simply standing up from the floor?  The answer is defined down below, and may surprise you!

5 Ways You Can Display Non-Traditional Impressive Feats of Strength

1. Turkish Get-up

  • The T-Get up is an ultimate test of strength, mobility and stability of the entire body.  You need to be able to stack your joints on top of each other and maintain stable joints under load, so the rest of your body can move without dropping a kettlebell, barbell or person on your head.
  • The movement involves lying down on the floor and standing up while maintaining a weight in the overhead position.
  • Begin this movement with a kettlebell.  Because the kettlebell keeps the weight external to the gripping hand, it offers unique advantages for shoulder health.

  • Progressions to impress
    • Barbell
    • Human Being

 2) Push-up

  • Most people that I see in the gym who are starting to workout with weights want to jump directly into the bench press and never want to start with the basics.  The push-up is the most under-rated exercise and is probably one that I see getting botched up the most.  Many people don’t have the core requirements, or were never taught the correct way to perform a perfect strict push-up.  But if you want to be impressive with your push-ups, an elite total of push-ups would be greater than 80 push-ups in a three minute period.
  • Doing this is not an eye-raising feat of strength.  If you want to up the ante, try progressing to the following.
    • One Arm Push-ups
    • One Arm – One Leg Push-ups

3. Iso 90/90 L Sit

  • This exercise requires not only significant core strength, but also considerable flexibility and upper body strength. The exercise requires you to hold yourself from a bar, rings, a tree, whatever you can grab a hold of; with elbows bent at 90 degrees and hips bent at 90 degrees.  I love exercises that require strength and tension to be developed throughout the body, that is what develops true strength.
  • To make this harder, go back to the original gymnastics L-Sit.  Press your hands into the floor and lift your butt and legs (they are to remain straight) off the floor).

4. Human Flag

  • This is probably my favorite one on the list.  This exercise crushes your entire lateral chain and requires you to build super-hero type strength that will gather crowds and applause from all. This kills your lats and obliques, and requires a lot of tension to hold.  The trick is in the pull/pull of the arms to generate enough force to allow the core to hold you up.

5. Levers

  • This is another gymnastic exercise that requires some serious core strength while turning heads when performed.  You can do these on monkey bars, tree branches, pull-up bars, rings, anything you can get your hands on.
  • The two types of levers I will be discussing here are the Front and Back levers.
    • Front Levers
      • This is an exercise that crushes your anterior core.  The arms, lats, delts, pecs and core all have to work synergistically to hold yourself in a straight line.
    • Back Levers
      • The easier of the two levers and the one that should be learned first.  The back lever attacks the posterior chain including the back, glutes, hamstrings, biceps and core.

  • If you want to learn more about training levers and other bodyweight feats, check out Al Kavado’s article here.

The aforementioned list are some fun exercises that will not only make you look more bad-ass, but will also make you stronger in your traditional strength training lifts: the dead-lift, squat, bench and overhead press.


Secrets of Strength Volume 1: Tips to a Bigger Deadlift

heavy-deadliftWhen it comes to dead lifting there are a few common mistakes that many people make.  By fixing these mistakes, you can instantly add weight to the bar and continue to get stronger while maintaining healthy joints.

1) Breathing – When it comes to life, breathing is essential.  When it comes to deadlifting… breathing is essential.  The ability to take a deep breath that fills your stomach and not your chest is vital to protecting your lower back in the deadlift.  If you need more information on breathing refer to this blog post here.

This breath causes an increase in intra-abdominal pressure, which in turn builds tension (tip 3) and keeps the spine from moving during the lift.  You can imagine that this pressure built is similar to the effects of a weight belt; it helps to support your lower back.  Why not just wear a weight belt? Because it does the work for your body and the core will never get stronger.  If you are going super heavy, 2x your body weight or more, you can add a weight belt, but you still need to have proper breathing.  If you are lifting anything less than that, you should not use a weight belt, let your core learn to protect your spine, it’s not like you can wear a weight belt every day can you?
Diaphragmatic Breathing2) Lats – The lats are the biggest players in the deadlift.  It is what connects your lower body and your upper body during the movement and keeps your back from folding like a cheap tent.  If you learn how to keep your lats tight, you will be able to increase your tension (tip #3) and lift more weight safely.  This adds to your core strength and again protects the spine.  The ability for your core to fire better, and for you to build tension is key for the success at deadlifts.

3) Tension – Here is where everyone goes wrong.  Someone can learn to breath perfect, set his or her lats tight, but when the start the deadlift, all that tension is lost.  Most commonly you see people do “the dip”.  This is where the person sets up, and brings their body closer to the floor before trying to ascend with the weight.  THIS IS AN INSTANT FAIL.  You will never be able to pull big weights that way. The second you drop all your tension is lost and you instantly become weaker.

The fix? Once you build your tension, maintain it and continue to push your feet through the floor.  Newton’s laws will take over from there.  “For every action there is an opposite and equal reaction.” Meaning if you push hard through the floor with your feet, you will eventually go up with that weight if you can produce enough force.

Want to learn more about the secrets of strength? Check out ironlionperformance.com.  Browse around, leave some comments, and sign up for their newsletter.  Upon doing so you will receive a great video on planks called the Secrets of Strength.

Questions, comments or concerns? I’d love to hear them! Leave a comment below!


Are You a Half Rep-per

I have seen all sorts of people in the gym and in hilariously ridiculous youtube videos of half rep-pers.  They load way too much weight on the bar, move it through a quarter of the range of motion, rack the weight and pound their chest.  While these people are in a cult all of their own, this is not the half rep-per I am talking about.

BadForm

The half rep-per I am talking about is most likely you.  Now, don’t get offended, you have yet to hear what I have to say yet!  But this is the single most common mistake I see in the gym day in and day out.  And it is what I refer to as half rep-ping, in its most literal sense.

What I am alluding to is a very important missing aspect of any resistance training program.  What is that, you ask!?  It is the eccentric aspect of any lift out there.

bench_press_eccentric

An eccentric contraction is a movement that causes a muscle to elongate, or is defined as the muscles insertion moving further away from the origin.  For example, when doing a bicep curl, the eccentric part of the exercise is bringing your arm back down to your side. As the forearm is moving away from the joint, the biceps muscle is getting longer.

So I know you’re wondering, well there is no way I don’t lower my arm to my side, because if I didn’t I couldn’t do my next rep.  And you’re also wondering how not doing an eccentric movement is only half the rep.  Well my friend, sit down and keep your arms and legs inside the vehicle at all times, because it’s going to be a wild ride.

What I mean by not doing the eccentric part of the exercise, is we never control that down phase.  When doing the bench press, people drop the bar until it bounces off their chest, and then they press the weight up.  In the squat, people fall into the hole and then try to grind back up to the top.  This is not necessarily wrong, but you are not getting the most out of your exercise.  This causes you to be weaker, and have less muscle.  We do this because the body likes to do things the easiest way possible.  And controlling the eccentric part of any lift takes much more energy than it does to drop the bar onto your chest, bounce it, and press it back up.

Next time you do any exercise: a lunge, squat, bench press, overhead press, pull-up, you name it – focus on controlling the weight down by squeezing the antagonistic muscles, then do the concentric phase. For exampleif doing an overhead press, press the weight overhead and as you bring the weight back down to your shoulders, squeeze your lats and pull the bar down as if you were doing a pull-up. Once the weight comes down to the shoulders,reverse the movement and bring it back over head.

You will be amazed at how much more muscle you activate doing this.  And as you progress, you will be stronger than ever.  You will start to build more muscle, have healthier joints and leave less weight on the ground.

P.S ladies, this still applies to you.  It will help you be stronger and more toned.  You will get a lot more out of your workouts and your body will thank me later.